rattlesnakes BELCHERTOWN, Mass (WWLP) –

150 venomous rattlesnakes could eventually be on the loose in the Quabbin Reservoir.  Rattlesnake Island is vital to saving the species from extinction  Do you support a proposal to create a habitat for poisonous rattlesnakes at the Quabbin Reservoir? Yes No Vote View ResultsPolldaddy.com In an attempt to stop the extinction of native timber rattlesnake, the the State Department of Fisheries and Wildlife plans to grow a population of timber rattlers, and place them on an island in the Quabbin Reservoir. It’s still in the planning stages, and any snake re-location is still years off. Residents are uneasy.  “Rattlesnakes are poisonous and they can certainly be a problem, so yeah, I guess I am concerned,” said Dale Gardner-Fox of Belchertown, who visits the reservoir often with her family.  Renee Sylvester of Belchertown told 22News she thinks all creatures can exist together, but it needs to be done the right way. “I’m all for reviving endangered species, but safely.”  Reservoir neighbors told 22News they worry snakes could swim to land. The Quabbin has miles of hiking trails and scenic routes, as well as nearby homes.  Quabbin Reservoir is one of the largest man-made public water supplies in the United States. The Quabbin Reservoir is the largest inland body of water in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and was built between 1930 and 1939. Today along with the Wachusett Reservoir, it is the primary water supply for Boston.  Erica Bernard of Belchertown said she doesn’t think it should be an issue if you go to the Quabbin and you’re hiking. You should be adequately prepared. “Wear boots. Wear long sleeves. Wear long pants and you shouldn’t have an issue,” said  Bernard.  More than 7000 people a year are biten by venomous snakes. Some Rattlesnakes remain in the Blue Hills, in Berkshire County, and here in the Connecticut River valley.  BELCHERTOWN, Mass (WWLP) – 150 venomous rattlesnakes could eventually be on the loose in the Quabbin Reservoir.  Rattlesnake Island is vital to saving the species from extinction  Do you support a proposal to create a habitat for poisonous rattlesnakes at the Quabbin Reservoir? Yes No Vote View ResultsPolldaddy.com In an attempt to stop the extinction of native timber rattlesnake, the the State Department of Fisheries and Wildlife plans to grow a population of timber rattlers, and place them on an island in the Quabbin Reservoir. It’s still in the planning stages, and any snake re-location is still years off. Residents are uneasy.  “Rattlesnakes are poisonous and they can certainly be a problem, so yeah, I guess I am concerned,” said Dale Gardner-Fox of Belchertown, who visits the reservoir often with her family.  Renee Sylvester of Belchertown told 22News she thinks all creatures can exist together, but it needs to be done the right way. “I’m all for reviving endangered species, but safely.”  Reservoir neighbors told 22News they worry snakes could swim to land. The Quabbin has miles of hiking trails and scenic routes, as well as nearby homes.  Quabbin Reservoir is one of the largest man-made public water supplies in the United States. The Quabbin Reservoir is the largest inland body of water in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and was built between 1930 and 1939. Today along with the Wachusett Reservoir, it is the primary water supply for Boston.  Erica Bernard of Belchertown said she doesn’t think it should be an issue if you go to the Quabbin and you’re hiking. You should be adequately prepared. “Wear boots. Wear long sleeves. Wear long pants and you shouldn’t have an issue,” said  Bernard.  More than 7000 people a year are biten by venomous snakes. Some Rattlesnakes remain in the Blue Hills, in Berkshire County, and here in the Connecticut River valley.

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